Nohemi Gazzillo

Foot Pain In Top Of Foot

Calcaneal Apophysitis The Truth

Overview

Severs disease, also known as calcaneal apophysitis, is a condition in which the growth plate along the heel becomes inflamed. It most commonly occurs in active, early-teen children. Most patients with Severs disease complain of heel pain. In general the pain is exacerbated with increased activities, such as running, jumping, or climbing stairs. The pain often improves with a period of rest.

Causes

Sever's disease can result from standing too long, which puts constant pressure on the heel. Poor-fitting shoes can contribute to the condition by not providing enough support or padding for the feet or by rubbing against the back of the heel. Although Sever's disease can occur in any child, these conditions increase the chances of it happening. Pronated foot (a foot that rolls in at the ankle when walking), which causes tightness and twisting of the Achilles tendon, thus increasing its pull on the heel's growth plate, flat or high arch, which affects the angle of the heel within the foot, causing tightness and shortening of the Achilles tendon, short leg syndrome (one leg is shorter than the other), which causes the foot on the short leg to bend downward to reach the ground, pulling on the Achilles tendon, overweight or obesity, which puts weight-related pressure on the growth plate

Symptoms

Chief complaint is heel pain which increases pain during running and jumping activities. Pain is localized to the very posterior aspect of the heel. Pain is elicited only with weightbearing. Mild involvement is present if pain is brought on only with running during sports. The symptoms can be severe, with pain (and possibly limp) with activities of daily living (ie walking).

Diagnosis

Sever?s disease is diagnosed based on a doctor?s physical examination of the lower leg, ankle, and foot. If the diagnosis is in question, the doctor may order x-rays or an MRI to determine if there are other injuries that may be causing the heel pain.

Non Surgical Treatment

Treatment may consist of one or more of the following. Elevating the heel. Stretching hamstring and calf muscles 2-3 times daily. Using R.I.C.E. (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation). Foot orthotics. Medication. Physical therapy. Icing daily (morning). Heating therapy. Open back shoe are best and avoid high heel shoe. The Strickland Protocol has shown a positive response in patients with a mean return to sport in less than 3 weeks. Further research into the anatomical and biomechanical responses of this protocol are currently being undertaken.
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